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Benjamin Franklin Air Rifles: A Collector's Dream or a Nightmare?


How to Find and Decode the Serial Number of Your Benjamin Franklin Air Rifle




If you own a Benjamin Franklin air rifle, you might be wondering how old it is and where it was made. You might also be curious about its model number and what features it has. Fortunately, there is a way to find out these information by looking at the serial number of your air rifle.




benjamin franklin air rifle serial number


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The serial number is a series of numbers and letters that are stamped on the left side of the barrel under the bolt. The serial number can tell you when and where your air rifle was manufactured, as well as its model number and caliber.


How to Read the Serial Number




The serial number of your Benjamin Franklin air rifle can be divided into two parts: the prefix and the suffix. The prefix is the first three or four digits of the serial number, and it indicates the month and year of manufacture. The suffix is the rest of the serial number, and it indicates the model number and caliber.


The prefix can be either three or four digits long, depending on when your air rifle was made. If your air rifle was made before 1992, then the prefix will be three digits long, and it will represent the year of manufacture. For example, if your prefix is 312, then your air rifle was made in 1931.


If your air rifle was made in or after 1992, then the prefix will be four digits long, and it will represent the month and year of manufacture. The first two digits will be the month, and the last two digits will be the year. For example, if your prefix is 1294, then your air rifle was made in December of 1994.


The suffix can vary in length, depending on the model number and caliber of your air rifle. The suffix will usually start with a letter that indicates the caliber of your air rifle. For example, if your suffix starts with a T, then your air rifle is a .22 caliber pellet gun. The rest of the suffix will be numbers that indicate the model number of your air rifle. For example, if your suffix is T1000, then your air rifle is a model 1000.


How to Find Your Model Number




If you are not sure what model number your Benjamin Franklin air rifle is, you can use the serial number to find out. You can also look at the end of the barrel at the top of the stock, where you will see a circle with the name of the company around it. Inside the circle, you will see a number that represents your model number.


Some common Benjamin Franklin air rifle model numbers are:


  • 310: Pneumatic, .22 cal. lead shot, single shot with push-pull pump style and striker valve release



  • 312: Pneumatic, .22 cal. pellet, single shot with push-pull pump style and trigger operated valve release



  • 317: Pneumatic, .177 cal. pellet, single shot with push-pull pump style and trigger operated valve release



  • 340: Pneumatic, .177 cal. pellet, single shot with lever pump action mechanism



  • 342: Pneumatic, .22 cal. pellet, single shot with lever pump action mechanism



  • 347: Pneumatic, .177 cal. pellet, single shot with lever pump action mechanism



How to Find Out More About Your Air Rifle




If you want to learn more about your Benjamin Franklin air rifle, such as its history, features, and value, you can use online resources to do some research. One of the best sources of information is the Crosman website (https://discover.crosman.com/blog/benjamin-sheridan-product-dates-of-manufacture), where you can find a detailed chart that shows the dates of manufacture for different models and calibers of Benjamin Franklin air rifles.


You can also visit online forums and blogs that are dedicated to air gun enthusiasts and collectors (such as https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/AmericanVintageAirguns/how-to-identify-my-benjamin-franklin-air-rifle-t2373.html), where you can ask questions and share your experiences with other owners of Benjamin Franklin air rifles. You might also find some useful tips and tricks on how to maintain and improve your air rifle's performance.


How to Care for Your Air Rifle




Your Benjamin Franklin air rifle is a valuable and durable piece of equipment, but it still needs proper care and maintenance to keep it in good working condition. Here are some tips on how to care for your air rifle:


  • Clean your air rifle regularly. Use a soft cloth to wipe off any dirt or dust from the exterior of your air rifle. Use a cleaning rod and a patch soaked in gun oil to clean the inside of the barrel. Do not use any abrasive materials or solvents that might damage the metal or the wood.



  • Oil your air rifle sparingly. Use a few drops of gun oil on the moving parts of your air rifle, such as the bolt, the trigger, and the pump mechanism. Do not over-oil your air rifle, as this might cause leaks or malfunctions.



  • Store your air rifle safely. Keep your air rifle in a cool and dry place, away from direct sunlight, heat, or moisture. Do not store your air rifle with a pellet in the chamber or with a CO2 cartridge attached. Always keep your air rifle unloaded and uncocked when not in use.



  • Handle your air rifle with care. Do not drop, hit, or bend your air rifle, as this might damage its parts or affect its accuracy. Do not expose your air rifle to extreme temperatures or humidity. Do not modify or tamper with your air rifle, as this might void its warranty or make it unsafe.



How to Troubleshoot Your Air Rifle




If you encounter any problems with your Benjamin Franklin air rifle, such as low power, poor accuracy, or leaks, you can try some simple troubleshooting steps before contacting a professional service center. Here are some common issues and their possible solutions:


  • Low power: Check the pressure of your CO2 cartridge or the number of pumps you are using. If the CO2 cartridge is low or empty, replace it with a new one. If you are using a pneumatic air rifle, make sure you are pumping enough times to achieve the optimal pressure. You can also check the condition of the seals and valves of your air rifle and replace them if they are worn or damaged.



  • Poor accuracy: Check the alignment of your sights and adjust them if necessary. You can also check the condition of your barrel and clean it if it is dirty or obstructed. Make sure you are using the right type and size of pellets for your air rifle and that they are not deformed or damaged.



  • Leaks: Check the connections and fittings of your CO2 cartridge or your pump mechanism and tighten them if they are loose. You can also check the condition of the seals and valves of your air rifle and replace them if they are worn or damaged.